Questions For Trump Supporters

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DD(Copy/email/share this link by twitter/facebook or repost on blogs and in comment sections. Begin a dialogue among voters; discuss the future of government, its importance, its provisions, its support of national goals.  /wr)

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If you voted for Trump, did you intend for him as President to defund the government–by giving huge tax breaks to giant corporations and the rich, that will increase the federal deficit to a size a trillion dollars bigger than the total current federal budget?

Or look at it this way: Apple’s cash-on-hand doubled in the last three years and now equals the world’s 42nd largest GDP (if it were a country). Does Apple need a tax break?

If you voted for Trump, do you believe tax breaks for corporations create jobs? How? How will giving GM or Ford a tax cut sell a car? Do you think it will reduce the price of cars–that corporations will use the windfall of cash to cut prices? GM and Ford already have more than $20 billion in free cash (after taxes!). Is it being used to slash car prices? Will GM and Ford hire for their factories if more cars are not being sold? Will their suppliers make more parts if they can’t be put on cars?

Microsoft, Google, Pfizer, Cisco, Oracle are among the companies whose hoards of free cash exceed $30 billion or more–how will these tech companies create new jobs with their windfalls? Tech companies are having problems finding engineers and STEM people for current positions; how will free billions improve employment?

Did you know for the past two years, five million jobs have gone unfilled each month? That’s right! Five million jobs! Each month! Will cutting taxes put fill these positions–jobs already available and waiting for workers?

Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, Total Unfilled Job Vacancies for the United States© [LMJVTTUVUSM647S], retrieved from FRED, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/LMJVTTUVUSM647S, April 26, 2017.

Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, Total Unfilled Job Vacancies for the United States© [LMJVTTUVUSM647S], retrieved from FRED, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/LMJVTTUVUSM647S, April 26, 2017.

If you voted for Trump and support his tax cuts (his one page summary represents tax cuts are you aware his proposed outline is not tax reform–it ignores loopholes and other tax issues tied to special issues! His one page plan keeps intact the myriad of deductions, credits, exclusions, preferences, exemptions, and other loopholes in the 75,000 pages of tax code that are the work of special interests and lobbyists. One of the main beneficiaries of Trump’s proposal is Trump himself!

Do you believe wealth creates jobs and not demand? Will Apple’s wealth direct you to buy an iphone, or Cisco’s wealth to buy a router? Or Pfizer’s wealth to pay more drugs?

If you voted for Trump, can’t you see you are simply being deceived? These tax cuts create wealth not jobs. The rich will gain capital; workers’ wages will remain stagnant. The accounts of the rich will grow, jobs will not.

Not wealth, demand increases jobs. The administration has no plan for job growth; no plan for development that looks a future trends and forecasts ways to position American businesses and industries for new trends and landmarks. One of the most important is the most urgent: the global middle class will expand and double in size by 2030, to five billion people; the US share will slip from 18 to 8 percent. US businesses are not preparing/planning for the incredible opportunity reflected in this massive concrete change in the global consumer market.

If you voted for Trump, do you know Kansas tried this plan and failed dismally! The Los Angeles Times reported:

The survey compiles state-level statistics on nonfarm payroll employment, average hours worked in manufacturing by production workers, the unemployment rate, and inflation-adjusted wages and salaries.

The tax package Brownback enacted in 2012 cut the top personal income tax rates sharply. The rate on income under $30,000 was pared to 3% from 3.5%. Pass-through business income was made fully tax-exempt. The law increased the standard deduction, but also eliminated several tax credits that assisted the poor.

In follow-on changes the next year, the top income tax rate was cut further. But other cuts were reversed, effectively raising taxes for the middle class and working class. In all, as was documented by the Washington-based Center for Budget and Policy Priorities, the changes cut the taxes of the wealthiest 1% of Kansans by 2.2% and raised them for the poorest 20% by 1.3%.

It should go without saying that far from paying for themselves, these cuts have blown a huge and growing hole in the state budget. Income tax collections are more than 22% below their pre-cut levels. Schools, universities and road repairs all have taken a hit in spending.

The Kansas experience is important because the notion that dramatic tax cuts pay for themselves by spurring economic growth still unaccountably has an allure for conservative policymakers, despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary. Brownback, who took office in 2010, promised that “our new pro-growth tax policy will be like a shot of adrenaline into the heart of the Kansas economy.” He was seconded by his tax advisor, the notorious Arthur Laffer, who forecast “enormous prosperity” for the state.

Kansas has seen no job growth. Neither will the US, if the country follows suit.

 

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